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Os melhores Anthropology podcasts que encontramos
Os melhores Anthropology podcasts que encontramos
Esses podcasts de antropologia cobrem tudo, desde geologia, biodiversidade, conhecimento incomum sobre humanos, cultura, história, potencial da humanidade e muito mais — então explore esses podcasts em seu próprio lazer e você não ficará desapontado!
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Anthropology on Air

Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen

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Anthropology on Air is a podcast brought to you by the Social Anthropology department at the University of Bergen in Norway. Each season, we bring you conversations with inspiring thinkers from the anthropology world and beyond. The music in the podcast is made by Victor Lange, and the episodes are produced by Sadie Hale and Sidsel Marie Henriksen. You can follow us on Facebook. Visit uib.no/antro, where you can find more information on the ongoing work and upcoming events at the department.
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Stupid Anthropology has birthed from the ashes of The Right Can’t Read. We have leapt from the desiccated skull like a weird zombie Athena to sometimes ask stupid questions, sometimes our stupid ideas, sometimes our stupid screaming into the void. Join Aaron, Robert, and Jonny as we explore whatever diseased questions pop into our collapsing brains. Questions such as: What’s the deal with selling out? Who are the worst people that came on Oprah’s show? What’s the deal with airline food?
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The Anthropology in Business podcast is for anthropologists and business leaders interested in learning more about the many ways anthropology is applied in business and why business anthropology is one of the most effective lenses for making sense of organizations and consumers. It is hosted by Matt Artz, a business anthropologist specializing in design anthropology and working at the intersection of product management, user experience, and business strategy. To learn more about the Anthropo ...
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Real life lectures recorded from a college classroom, on the topic of Physical Anthropology. It introduces primates, biology, evolution, fossils, dentition, and much more - relating to monkeys, primates and humans.
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Conversations in Anthropology

Conversations in Anthropology

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A podcast about life, the universe and anthropology produced by David Boarder Giles, Timothy Neale, Cameo Dalley, Mythily Meher and Matt Barlow. Each episode features an anthropologist or two in conversation, discussing anthropology and what it has to tell us in the twenty-first century. This podcast is made in partnership with the American Anthropological Association and with support from the Faculty of Arts & Education at Deakin University.
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SAGE Anthropology & Archaeology

SAGE Publications Ltd.

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Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Anthropology & Archaeology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
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Nutrition Anthropology Podcast

Annette Adams, MDA, RDN, LD/N

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Has one-size-fits-all nutrition advice let you down? Join registered dietitian nutritionist, Annette Adams, as she shares a new approach to health and well-being that honors you as the expert of you. Nutrition Anthropology podcast discusses social customs, beliefs, and norms regarding nutrition through a weight neutral lens. We tackle human behavior – past and present – as it relates to food and well-being. Our mission is to provide a safe space for every body to create a positive relationsh ...
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Innovation in Digital Anthropology

LiiV Center + Matt Artz

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The Innovation in Digital Anthropology podcast is brought to you by the LiiV Center and Matt Artz. The LiiV Center is a nonprofit advancing how the world understands people in the digital age. The team at the Liiv Center, in partnership with UNESCO, is working to advance education, technology, and awareness for innovation in digital anthropology as a force for good across the public and private sectors. To help accomplish that goal, we have created this podcast, in which we will explore the ...
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The Anthropology, AI, and the Future of Human Society podcast mini-series was created in anticipation of the upcoming Anthropology, AI, and the Future of Human Society Virtual Conference. It is being organized by the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland and runs from June 6-10th, 2022. The podcast was created as a partnership between the Royal Anthropological Institute and Matt Artz.
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Immanuel Kant gave a series of lectures on anthropology 1772-1773, 1795-1796 at the University of Königsberg, which was founded in 1544. His lectures dealt with recognizing the internal and external in man, cognition, sensuousness, the five senses, as well as the soul and the mind. They were gathered together and published in 1798 and then published in English in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1867, volumes 9-16. Therefore, several texts will be used for this book. I was able to fi ...
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Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel talks with danah boyd, Partner Researcher at Microsoft Research, founder of the Data & Society Research Institute, and a distinguished visiting professor at Georgetown University, about her career and work. The pair discuss boyd's the genesis and intellectual background of boyd's now classic text, It's Complicated: …
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Robert, Aaron, and Jonny have a completely reasonable conversation about what's happening in Gaza. While listening, why not do something productive like donate to Medical Aid for Palestinians, UNHCR, or any number of other groups trying to materially improve the conditions of people who are the latest victims of the United States military-industria…
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In this episode, we speak with Martin Eggen Mogseth and Fartein Hauan Nilsen about their first edited volume, Limits of Life: Reflections on Life, Death, and the Body in the Age of Technoscience (Berghahn Books, 2024). The book explores how fundamental concepts such as life, birth, selfhood, religion, death, and ancestry are being reshaped in an er…
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In this podcast episode, Professor Burlingame illuminates the differences, and similarities, between ethnobotany and folk medicine. This podcast is a must for anyone looking to be inspired by a deeper understanding of how and why humans use plants for health and healing. (10 minutes and 08 seconds) Mentioned In Episode: "The Medical Anthropology Se…
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In this episode of the Anthropology in Business podcast, Jay Hasbrouck speaks with Matt Artz about his career as a business anthropologist. They also discuss the evolving role of anthropology and insights in business, the second edition of his book Ethnographic Thinking: From Method to Mindset, and how ethnographic thinking can help organizations n…
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Cosmopolitan Elites: Indian Diplomats and the Social Hierarchies of Global Order (Oxford University Press, 2023) by Dr. Kira Huju narrates the birth, everyday life, and fracturing of a Western-dominated global order from its margins. It offers a critical sociological examination of the elite Indian Foreign Service and its members, many of whom were…
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People before Markets:: An Alternative Casebook (Cambridge UP, 2022) presents twenty comparative case studies of important global questions, such as 'Where should our food come from?' 'What should we do about climate change?' and 'Where should innovation come from?' A variety of solutions are proposed and compared, including market-based, economic,…
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The unintended consequences of youth empowerment programs for Latino boys Educational research has long documented the politics of punishment for boys and young men of color in schools—but what about the politics of empowerment and inclusion? In Good Boys, Bad Hombres: The Racial Politics of Mentoring Latino Boys in Schools (U Minnesota Press, 2024…
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As Andrew M. Gardner explains in The Fragmentary City: Migration, Modernity, and Difference in the Urban Landscape of Doha, Qatar (Cornell UP, 2024) in Qatar and elsewhere on the Arabian Peninsula, nearly nine out of every ten residents are foreign noncitizens. Many of these foreigners reside in the cities that have arisen in Qatar and neighboring …
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With the rapid development of artificial intelligence and labor-saving technologies like self-checkouts and automated factories, the future of work has never been more uncertain, and even jobs requiring high levels of human interaction are no longer safe. The Last Human Job: The Work of Connecting in a Disconnected World (Princeton UP, 2024) explor…
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Genetic clues have unveiled a type of ritual child sacrifice at an ancient Maya site that consisted only of young boys, often chosen as closely related pairs that included twins. The discovery stems from a burial of more than 100 people in an underground chamber discovered in 1967 at Chichén Itzá, a once-dominant Maya city in what is now Mexico’s Y…
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Protracted economic crises, accelerating inequalities, and increased resource scarcity present significant challenges for the majority of Africa's urban population. Limited state capacity and widespread infrastructure deficiencies common in cities across the continent often require residents to draw on their own resources, knowledge, and expertise …
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Today I talked to Benjamin Breen about his book Tripping on Utopia: Margaret Mead, the Cold War, and the Troubled Birth of Psychedelic Science (Grand Central, 2024). The generation that survived the second World War emerged with a profoundly ambitious sense of social experimentation. In the '40s and '50s, transformative drugs rapidly entered mainst…
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Indigenous Knowledge and Science Unite Recent research has reshaped our understanding of when horses were reintroduced to North America. Spaniards brought horses to Mexico in 1519, but it was Indigenous peoples who swiftly transported these horses north along trade routes. A new study in Science1 reveals that many Native American populations across…
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In Tabula Raza: Mapping Race and Human Diversity in American Genome Science (University of California Press, 2024), Duana Fullwiley has penned an intimate chronicle of laboratory life in the genomic age. She presents many of the influential scientists at the forefront of genetics who have redefined how we practice medicine and law and understand an…
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Neanderthal genes present in modern humans may have been introduced through an extended period of interbreeding starting around 47,000 years ago and lasting nearly 7,000 years, according to new research. New research indicates that Neanderthals (front skeleton) interbred with humans (back skeleton) starting 47,000 years ago, continuing for nearly 7…
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After the end of the Maoist era in the People's Republic of China, the rise of queer communities and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) has generated growing public and academic attention. Drawing on over a decade of ethnographic fieldwork in northwest China, Casey James Miller offers a novel, compelling, and intimately personal perspective on C…
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Each year in India more than two million people fall sick with tuberculosis (TB), an infectious, airborne, and potentially deadly lung disease. The country accounts for almost 30 percent of all TB cases worldwide and well above a third of global deaths from it. Because TB’s prevalence also indicates unfulfilled development promises, its control is …
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An innovative approach to studying Neanderthal hearths has been hailed as a "major" breakthrough in archaeology, promising to shed new light on the behaviors of prehistoric humans. This groundbreaking research, published in the journal Nature1, utilized advanced dating techniques to analyze hearths at the El Salt site in Spain, revealing intricate …
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The Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) introduced a series of state-led initiatives promising modernity, progress, national grandeur, and stability; state surveyors assessed land for agrarian reform, engineers used nationalized oil for industrialization, archaeologists reconstructed pre-Hispanic monuments for tourism, and anthropologists studied and ph…
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The New Timeline of Horse Domestication Recent research1 has upended previous assumptions about the domestication of horses, revealing that humans first domesticated these animals around 2200 B.C., a full millennium later than traditionally believed. This finding emerges from a comprehensive study of ancient horse DNA, which sheds new light on the …
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Alan McGowan delves into Franz Boas’s dual identity as both a scientist and a political activist, shedding light on how his work transcended academic boundaries to make a profound impact on society. In The Political Activism of Anthropologist Franz Boas, Citizen Scientist (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2024), McGowan provides a comprehensive overview o…
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In 2011, Syrians took to the streets demanding freedom. Brutal government repression transformed peaceful protests into one of the most devastating conflicts of our times, killing hundreds of thousands and displacing millions. The Home I Worked to Make: Voices from the New Syrian Diaspora (Liveright, 2024) takes Syria’s refugee outflow as its point…
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Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel talks to Jennifer Hart, Professor and Chair of the History Department at Virginia Tech, about her work on the history and ethnography of mobility and infrastructure in Ghana. Hart’s newest book, Making an African City: Technopolitics and the Infrastructure of Everyday Life in Colonial Accra (Indiana University Press…
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Newburgh is a small postindustrial city of some twenty-eight thousand people located sixty miles north of New York City in the Hudson River Valley. Like many other similarly sized cities across America, it has been beset with poverty and crime after decades of decline, with few opportunities for its predominantly minority residents. Sixty Miles Upr…
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This field-defining volume of queer anthropology foregrounds both the brilliance of anthropological approaches to queer and trans life and the ways queer critique can reorient and transform anthropology. Consisting of fourteen original essays by both distinguished and new voices, Unsettling Queer Anthropology: Foundations, Reorientations, and Depar…
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In Violent Intimacies: The Trans Everyday and the Making of an Urban World (Duke UP, 2024), Aslı Zengin traces how trans people in Turkey creatively negotiate and resist everyday cisheteronormative violence. Drawing on the history and ethnography of the trans communal life in Istanbul, Zengin develops an understanding of cisheteronormative violence…
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What is social mobility? In Social Mobility (Polity Press, 2023), Anthony Heath, an Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Oxford and Yaojun Li, a Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester, explore and explain this concept, setting out why the idea matters for both social scientists and the general reader. The book draws …
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In this podcast, Professor Burlingame teaches you about ethnobotany through a medical anthropology focus on medicinal plants. Use the knowledge you gain in this episode to positively inspire you on your health and wellness journey. (8 minutes and 45 seconds) Support the Show. BOOK A FREE CALL with me to discuss your Masterclass possibilities! Maste…
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Nisrin Elamin is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Toronto whose work investigates the connections between land, race, belonging, and empire-making in Sudan and the broader Sahel region. Elamin joins the Ufahamu Africa podcast for this episode focused on the conflict in Sudan. Books, Links and Articles “Recent protests in …
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In Disability Worlds (Duke UP, 2024), Faye Ginsburg and Rayna Rapp chronicle and theorize two decades of immersion in New York City’s wide-ranging disability worlds as parents, activists, anthropologists, and disability studies scholars. They situate their disabled children’s lives among the experiences of advocates, families, experts, activists, a…
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