India MBA público
[search 0]
Mais

Download the App!

show episodes
 
At age 67, I have varied and rich experience of innovation ( including TRIZ) and leadership - 26 years in the army and about 18 in the corporate world. I have two books - 'Leadership for Colonels & Business Managers' and 'Reclaim your Democracy'. I am a deep thinker, very influenced by Nicholos Taleb on randomness. Feel strongly pulled to do something for my country and my people. alok.asthana@gmail.com. +91 9821677859, Thane 400607, India
 
Loading …
show series
 
Many managers and coaches jump into advising or penalizing, the moment the other person acts contrary to their expectations. While they know that no person does anything against his perceived self-interest, they fail to take this into account. If only they took some time to get to know how the other person justifies that act to himself! The key lie…
 
An unjust system creates a feeling in citizens that he is not obliged to sacrifice anything, as the people in power are not sacrificing anything. That mindset is very harmful for a country and a society. When the citizen is also a soldier, this mindset can have extremely harmful effects.
 
Today, public opinion is mostly shaped by those working under some organisation and are prepared to take up strikes, hate-speeches etc. The crores who too have an opinion but are prepared to only put down two lines on social media, and no more, are unable to affect public opinion. This is due to lack of the right instruments and tools. So, what can…
 
A group exists primarily to perform a task. So, task completion needs of the group as supreme. However, the task can be completed only if there is no sand in the system. So, the next need is to maintain the group. Since the group is merely a collection of individuals, it can be maintained only by looking after the individual needs of individuals.…
 
Leadership requires making the decision whether the leader is trying to be loved or respected. There is no absolute dictum on this. However, once you are able to clarify the situation your group is in presently, particularly in terms of Productivity, Satisfaction and Development, you can get a good answer to this question Much more in my book - Lea…
 
As you can tell if you listen to this podcast, I was really excited to get to have a personal conversation with Craig Storti. It was only after reading his book, Speaking of India, that I was first able to pinpoint some of the unique challenges that face anyone working with India. Craig, who started out as a US Peace Corps volunteer, is extremely d…
 
“Bureaucracy is a lot of little people trying to follow the rules as they interpret it.” Meet Carissa Hickling, Mumbai’s own Whisky Lady, and the 12th guest on the Working With India podcast. Carissa runs her own consulting firm, and has been in India for over 20 years. In this episode you will hear: The benefits and limits to being a foreigner in …
 
“Calling me on a Sunday is a sign of…” Your first answer might be rudeness, unprepared thinking, or an invasion of privacy. But add 17 years onto your India journey and you end this sentence with “respect”. Meet Patrick De Ridder, a student of Indian business and philosophy, and the next guest on Working with India. He came to India in 1997 and has…
 
Some paths in India are straight, others are squiggly. Sven Brandelik and Charlotta Osterberg-Mohandas both started their journeys in India with internships through AIESEC in 2007. Eight years later, Sven helps German-speaking companies create the right strategy for deeper engagement with India and Charlotta teaches yoga to individuals and corporat…
 
Sometimes it’s nice to know you aren’t the only one… When you come to India for the first time, you may wonder if you are the only one who notices the massive differences: the cows on the road, the work culture, the late night dinners. Is it ok to point them out? Can you laugh about them or is that taboo? It’s always nice when someone else confirms…
 
There are many types of expats in India, but knowing which ones to trust for advice can be hard. Ideally, you are looking for someone who has been living here for more than five years, has good business experience, a decent level of cultural knowledge, and isn’t prone to overreaction. David Peace has lived in Delhi since 2001, has run his own compa…
 
“If you come back from India thinking that all is well, then you haven’t learned a thing.” That’s the advice from Gunjan Bagla, the Indian Expert, in this episode of the Working with India Podcast. This is one of my favorite episodes so far, as we covered a wide variety of topics in great depth. Here’s another great quote: “Don’t assume it’s always…
 
Starting points are pretty varied in India. You are a man in your 50s who is coming in as the CEO of a new division. You are a retired woman in your 60s who is ready to start a new adventure. You are a young married couple getting some international exposure in your roles. Each starting place comes with its own challenges; you must learn where you …
 
I’m constantly amazed at the paths people take to India. Some people get called into an office one day and find themselves in an Indian airport the next week. Others come here trying to start their own business and capitalize on the Indian market. Others come to live out a sense of adventure. Then there’s Robert. Robert’s story in coming to India i…
 
You have identified an ideal partner for your business in India: strong financials, common interests, and experience in the field. The company is an older family-run business. You soon realize that the key to sealing an agreement is a meeting with the patriarch, an older man who doesn’t come to the office much anymore. His blessing is essential, bu…
 
Loading …

Guia rápido de referências

Google login Twitter login Classic login