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What moves the continents, creates mountains, swallows up the sea floor, makes volcanoes erupt, triggers earthquakes, and imprints ancient climates into the rocks? Oliver Strimpel, a former astrophysicist and museum director asks leading researchers to divulge what they have discovered and how they did it. To learn more about the series, and see images that support the podcasts, go to geologybites.com.
 
This Physical Geology course is designed to give you an understanding of how the Earth works. Topics that we will discuss include what causes earthquakes, how old is the Earth and how we know this, how has the Earth evolved into the world that we see, and the nature, limitations, and benefits associated with extracting natural resources, such as petroleum
 
This Physical Geology course is designed to give you an understanding of how the Earth works. Topics that we will discuss include: what causes earthquakes, how old is the Earth and how we know this, how has the Earth evolved into the world that we see, and the nature, limitations, and benefits associated with extracting natural resources, such as petroleum. Most of the lectures are in the Lecture (audio) playlist below. Most of the files have been edited to eliminate long pauses that occur w ...
 
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Join us as we interrupt our water series re-release to talk about a major current event - the eruption of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano in Tonga. It was a huge eruption in the South Pacific from a very active volcano. Its had some smaller eruptions in the last few months, but Saturday morning took the lid off. In fact, some instrumented Cascade…
 
Matt Jackson is a Professor of Earth Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He probes the chemical composition of the mantle by analyzing trace elements and isotopes in hot-spot lavas from around the world. In the podcast, he describes the intriguing heterogeneity among the hot-spots of the so-called “hot-spot highway” in the weste…
 
Jesse and Chris are recording face to face in Michigan. Join us as we follow the water issues theme in our re-release series. Show notes below: We liked talking about dams so much we did it again! Join our discussion on streams, how the normally operate, and how dams disrupt the way that streams function. We highlight a few things in this episode, …
 
This is a re-release of a much earlier episode on Dams. In our newly recorded intro, Jesse and I are in person and sitting across from each other as we give a little prelude to the episode. We also decide to re-release our dams revisited episode from earlier this past summer. Enjoy! In this episode we cover....you guessed it, dams! Dams are incredi…
 
Throughout geological history, various points on the Earth’s surface have been lifted up to great elevations and worn down into low, flat-lying regions. Determining surface elevation histories is difficult because rocks that were once on the surface are usually eroded away or buried. Furthermore, most rock-forming processes are not directly affecte…
 
A geology re-release of our talk about the worlds water and the issues we face. Jesse and Chris are face to face recording this time which presented some challenges as you'll soon hear. We had fun re-capping our water episode and we hope you have fun too as you hopefully learn a bit. In this episode, Jesse and Chris talk about water. That's right -…
 
The magnetic stripes frozen into the sea floor as it forms at mid-ocean ridges record the Earth’s magnetic field at the time of formation. Reversals in the Earth’s magnetic field define the edges of these stripes, in effect time-stamping the sea floor position. Chuck DeMets is Emeritus Professor of Geoscience at the University of Wisconsin, Madison…
 
This is Part 4 of our re-released Climate and Energy series! We are on a break right now, but there is always great geoscience information to learn about! Today we get to talk about something really relevant to our everyday lives, and the future - Geothermal Energy! Geothermal Energy is a term that means a few different things, but it all relies on…
 
As the name implies, oceanic lithosphere underlies the oceans of the world. Except when they are ophiolites, when oceanic lithosphere is thrust on top of a continental margin. Are ophiolites a special kind of oceanic lithosphere? Or are there peculiar tectonic circumstances that emplace denser oceanic rocks on top of lighter continental ones? Mike …
 
This is Part III of our re-released Climate and Energy series! We are on a break right now, but there is always great geoscience information to learn about! Did you know that nuclear fission reactions are natural? Uranium fission drives many types of nuclear power plants as well as nuclear weapons. However, these types of reactions occurred on Eart…
 
Some of the most extensive sandstone deposits in the world were deposited by wind. How do such aeolian rocks differ from water or ice-deposited rocks? And what do they reveal about the environments in which they formed? In the podcast she describes the dunes we see in the geological record on Earth, as well as on Mars and on a comet, and explains w…
 
Join us as we re-release of our favorite interviews that we have done, with one of the truly great climate scientists and communicators, Professor Michael Mann! Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor at The Pennsylvania State University, has a long history of studying and discussion climate change. His new book, titled The New Climate War, is out no…
 
The best maps we have of Venus were made by Magellan, a space probe that flew in the 1990s. In the summer of 2021, NASA approved a new mapping mission that will produce radically improved maps of the topography, radar reflectivity, and gravity field, and the first ever global map of surface rock type. Sue Smrekar, the mission Principal Investigator…
 
Join us as we discuss the science behind the greenhouse effect and how it all works. This is a re-release of a much earlier episode. As we take a SHORT break, we decided to release a theme of episodes surrounding Energy and Climate. They are in the news often right now, especially with the COP26 conference. This past fall, we have rising energy cos…
 
Almost all the evidence about the nascent solar system has been erased by processes accompanying the formation of the Sun and the bodies that formed out of the circumsolar disk about 4.6 billion years ago. But some meteorites and the tiny dust grains contained within them have anomalous compositions that can only be understood by invoking a history…
 
Today, we talk about the geology of Yosemite National Park. Specifically, we dive into 4 different aspects: 1- What's the story behind all this granite? 2- Why do these mountains look the way they do? Glaciers 3- What are all the cracks in the granite about? 4- Rockfall! The formation of granite is taught in a very traditional way. Magma intrudes d…
 
After months of high earthquake activity, a fissure opened up near the southwestern tip of Iceland on March 19, 2021. Over a period of about seven months, several other fissures opened up, generating lava flows several kilometers long that filled several valleys and created a new 150-meter high mountain, a sort of mini-shield volcano. The eruption …
 
Astronomers can detect other planets orbiting around stars in the sky. But, can those planets see us? That's the question, and Dr. Jackie Faherty has answers! This conversation is based on a paper that Dr. Faherty coauthored recently, found here. We interviewed Dr. Jackie Faherty about it! You can follow Dr. Faherty on Twitter and visit her website…
 
Long before radiometric dating appeared on the scene, the geological time scale was defined by the sedimentary record, and particularly by key fossils preserved within them. Throughout the Cambrian, and to a lesser extent until the end-Permian extinction about 300 million years later, trilobite fossils served as some of the most useful of these key…
 
Have you heard of Manhattan-Henge? It's a totally cool phenomenon that occurs in The Big Apple every spring and summer. We interviewed Dr. Jackie Faherty about it! You can follow Dr. Faherty on Twitter and visit her website to learn more! Please leave us a review and rating! Follow us on all the social medias we are @planetgeocast —————————————————…
 
We’re all familiar with the idea of ice ages during which the polar ice caps advance to cover significant portions of their respective hemispheres, and then, after a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years, retreat back to the polar regions. But now we believe that twice during the Earth’s history, the ice advanced all the way to the equat…
 
In this episode, we discuss the categories - or different types of volcanoes in the world. We begin by discussing how the traditional categories, as found in most textbooks, are not adequate. There are too many exceptions to the rules. So we begin by discussing the typical 3 - Shield, stratovolcanoes, and cinder cones. Then, we expand the categorie…
 
The heat liberated during the formation of our planet created an ocean of magma. As it began to cool, the Earth differentiated into a dense metallic core surrounded by a less dense rocky mantle. At some point, we know that the surface of the Earth must have formed itself into the rigid blocks we call plates, and that these plates began to move and …
 
In this GeoShort, we discuss Mount St. Helens, one of Chris' favorite volcanoes and probably the reason he got into geoscience! This is the Scientific American article, written by Steve Olson, about Mount St. Helens that serves as the backbone for much of our discussion. Mount St. Helens is a famous volcano in Washington State that erupted in 1980.…
 
Many processes in geology affect the temperature of rocks. Erosion is one example — as a surface is eroded, the rocks below get closer to the surface, cooling as they go. So if we know the temperature history of a rock, we can infer its erosion history. Becky Flowers has a thermochronology lab in which she determines the cooling history of rocks as…
 
Today we are talking about all things Venus! Our host - Professor Martha Gilmore of Wesleyan University - is a world expert on Earth's Toxic Twin planet, Venus. Venus is the second planet from the sun and the target for newly announced NASA Missions in the coming decade! Venus has a super thick atmosphere that is dominated by CO2, it may or may not…
 
The geological history of Central Europe is quite complicated. The region is composed of several continental blocks having quite distinct origins that came together over 300 million years ago in the Paleozoic Era. Then, in the Mesozoic, many of the original rocks were overlaid, and continued plate movements caused mountain belts to form. In a previ…
 
Well, we got to interview yet another amazing geoscientist - Professor Martha Gilmore of Wesleyan University! Professor Gilmore is a world expert on Venus, the second planet from the sun and the target for newly announced NASA Missions in the coming decade! In this preview to the full interview with Dr. Gilmore, we discuss how she collects data on …
 
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