Linguistics público
[search 0]
Mais

Download the App!

show episodes
 
A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics by Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne. A weird and deep conversation about language delivered right to your ears the third Thursday of every month. "Joyously nerdy" –Buzzfeed. Listened to all the episodes here and wish there were more? Want to talk with other people who are enthusiastic about linguistics? Get bonus episodes and access to our Discord community at www.patreon.com/lingthusiasm Shownotes and transcripts: www.lingthusiasm.com
 
Light-hearted conversation with callers from all over about new words, old sayings, slang, family expressions, language change and varieties, as well as word histories, linguistics, regional dialects, word games, grammar, books, literature, writing, and more. You can join author/journalist Martha Barnette and linguist/lexicographer Grant Barrett on the show with your language thoughts, questions, and stories: https://waywordradio.org/contact or words@waywordradio.org. In the US 🇺🇸 and Canada ...
 
Welcome to the official podcast of World Linguistics. Here you’ll find inspiration if you’re a language learner and tips on how to learn languages. You’ll also discover some of the reasons why learning languages is important in the twenty-first century. Visit https://www.world-linguistics.com/contact to get your first two tutoring and conversation practice sessions free. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/worldlinguistics/support
 
This podcast series will highlight some of the most important aspects of linguistics. Over the span of numerous episodes, we’ll discuss topics such as the definition of linguistics, history of the English language, word structure, speech sounds, grammar, meaning, sentence structure, and more. If you’re interested in learning more about language but don’t have oodles of free time, this series will introduce you to the beauty of linguistics in short and sweet light-hearted episodes.
 
en clair is a podcast about forensic linguistics, literary detection, language mysteries, cryptography, codes, language and the law, linguistic crime, undeciphered languages, and more, from past to present. Credits, links, podcast transcripts and more in the Case Notes: wp.lancs.ac.uk/enclair
 
What do Portuguese explorers have to do with the Korean word for “bread”? Why has the Korean government started using a new word for “website”? And how come there’s a different word for “house” when you’re talking about your grandmother? This biweekly podcast takes you on a deep dive into Korean linguistics through the lens of a single word per episode. Hosted by Jaymin, a native Korean speaker and history professor, and Sara, a 2nd language Korean speaker with a graduate education in lingui ...
 
lingcast is a new linguistics podcast where the host, Blake Reed, will discuss the amazing quirks and interesting facts hidden within the English language. There are so many weird and wonderful explanations for the ways in which we communicate that could answer a lot of our problems. Join us and listen close, you might just learn something.
 
Linguistics After Dark is a podcast where three linguists (and sometimes other people) answer your burning questions about language, linguistics, and whatever else you need advice about. We have three rules: any question is fair game, there's no research allowed, and if we can't answer, we have to drink. It's a little like CarTalk for language: call us if your language is making a funny noise, and we'll get to the bottom of it, with a lot of rowdy discussion and nerdy jokes along the way. At ...
 
(We are now on Lybsyn) As humans we must understand the limits of our wisdom and ask questions to expand our knowledge for full understanding of life. We know the best way to do this is to expose yourself to anything and learn directly from people involved in situation. Providing a lighter perspective on recurrences or patterns in our every day life, we want to bring you guys one the best podcasts available because of our outlook on life as a 'millennial'. So please tune in, and give it a li ...
 
Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE, with selected new podcasts that will span a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. Our Podcasts are designed to act as teaching tools, providing further insight into our content through editor and author commentaries and interviews with special guests. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Necesitar is a Spanish verb that means “to need”. In this episode, we’ll discuss how to conjugate it in the present perfect, and in the conditional.Please visit https://www.youtube.com/WorldLinguisticsTV for more free educational content for Spanish-language learners and for self-learning.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way t…
 
Some people work hard to lose their accent in order to fit in. Others may be homesick for the voices they grew up with and try to reclaim them. How can you regain your old accent? Also, a compelling book about scientific taxonomy shows how humans use language to try to divide up and impose order on the word. And Uff-dah!is an expressive word that m…
 
A chat with Dr Kelly Wright, who’s been working on… well, really a lot. Kelly is at the juncture of a lot of areas we’re keen on. Oxford’s effort to document African-American English? She’s been there. Doing lexicography with the American Dialect Society? She’s on it. The LSA’s social media committee? She… was on it. And she’s been looking into a n…
 
We use questions to ask people for information (who’s there?), but we can also use them to make a polite request (could you pass me that?), to confirm social understanding (what a game, eh), and for stylistic effect, such as ironic or rhetorical questions (who knows!). In this episode, your hosts Lauren Gawne and Gretchen McCulloch get enthusiastic…
 
Hello, everybody, and welcome back to another episode from World Linguistics Podcast! My name is Kyle Mathis, and I’ll be narrating these episodes. Before we start, I would like to give a huge thank you to all of our students, listeners, and viewers for your continued support. World Linguistics would not be what it is today without all of you, so t…
 
A new book about how animals perceive their environment reveals immense worlds beyond our own. A bee can see ultraviolet light, catfish have taste buds all over their bodies, and manatees use highly sensitive lips to examine nearby objects. Also, what’s the relationship between romantic novels and Romance languages? Plus, sometimes buying gingerbre…
 
Welcome to Season 3 Episode 63 of World Linguistics Podcast. In this week's episode, we'll discuss the Spanish verb "necesitar" and how to conjugate it in the present indicative, and in the preterite.Visit https://www.youtube.com/worldlinguisticstv for over 160 free educational videos.Visit https://www.world-linguistics.com/contact and enter your n…
 
Some college students are using the word loyalty as a synonym for monogamy. Are the meanings of these words now shifting? Plus, a biologist discovers a new species of bat, then names it after a poet he admires. Also, warm memories of how a childhood library card becomes a passport to new worlds. And: for a spell vs. cast a spell, thaw vs. unthaw, t…
 
While compiling the Oxford English Dictionary, lexicographer James Murray exchanged hundreds of letters a week with authors, advisors, and volunteer researchers. A new collection online lets you eavesdrop on discussions about which words should be in the dictionary and why — including words that might offend Victorian sensibilities. Also why are so…
 
Have you ever wondered how to conjugate the Spanish verb "amplificar" in the present perfect and the conditional? If so, then this episode is for you.Thanks for tuning in! The links as advertised in this episode are listed below. If you liked what you listened to, you can visit them and see what we have to offer.Subscribe to our YouTube channel for…
 
Need a slang term that can replace just about any noun? Try chumpie. If you're from Philadelphia, you may already know this handy placeholder word. And there's Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Manhattan, and … The Bronx — why do we add the definite article to the name of that New York borough? The answer lies in the area's geography and local famil…
 
In this interview with linguist Danny Bate, we go deep on all things gender––grammatical gender, that is. Why do some languages have gender while others don't? Where does gender come from? What is the function of gender? To get 50% off your first month of Lingoda courses, follow this link: https://try.lingoda.com/Words_Nov…
 
Subscribe to our YouTube channel for access to over 160 educational videos with subtitles included for the deaf and hard of hearing: https://www.youtube.com/WorldLinguisticsTV.Also, be sure to visit https://www.world-linguistics.com/contact and enter your name, email, and phone number to get your first two sessions free.Thanks for your continued su…
 
Diamond dust, tapioca snow, and sugar icebergs — a 1955 glossary of arctic and subarctic terms describes the environment in ways that sound poetic. And a mom says her son is dating someone who's non-binary. She supports their relationship, but still struggles to use their preferred pronouns in a way that feels natural to her. Plus, A Way with Words…
 
It was a dark and stormy night. So begins the long and increasingly convoluted prose of Edwards Bulwer-Lytton’s best-known novel. Today the annual Bulwer-Lytton Contest asks contestants for fanciful first sentences that are similarly convoluted and over-the-top — often with hilarious results. Plus: George Orwell’s prescient novel 1984 gave us the t…
 
Yes, linguistics is all through the world of sci-fi, but science fiction has had a surprising impact on linguistic research as well. Dr Hannah Little is cataloguing the ways in a new book, and she joins us for this episode.Por Daniel Midgley, Ben Ainslie, and Hedvig Skirgård
 
Maps of languages of the world are fun to look at, but they’re also often suspiciously precise: a suspiciously round number of languages, like 7000, mapped to dots or coloured zones with suspiciously exact and un-overlapping locations. And yet, if you’ve ever eavesdropped on people on public transit, you know that any given location often plays hos…
 
High school students in Alabama share some favorite slang terms. If someone tells you to touch grass, they’re telling you to get a reality check — but the last thing you’d actually want to touch is dog water! Also, the history of the word hangover, and the many names, in several languages, for the effects of drinking too much alcohol. Plus, Do you …
 
Enthusiastic book recommendations! Martha's savoring the biography of Alexander von Humboldt, the 19th-century explorer, polymath, and naturalist who revolutionized our understanding of nature and predicted the effects of human activity on climate. Grant's enjoying A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, about how the study of DNA is rewriting …
 
In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss the Spanish verb “amplificar” and its conjugations in the present indicative, and in the preterite. Visit world-linguistics.com/contact and enter your name, email, and phone number to get your first two Spanish-language classes free.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. h…
 
A documentary film called My Beautiful Stutter follows youngsters at a summer camp specifically for stutterers. It's a place for finding acceptance, support, and confidence for navigating the larger world. And:, "The High Priestess of Soul," Nina Simone, was one of the most beguiling performers of all time. A beautiful new picture book for children…
 
There are word nerds, and then there’s the woman who set up a folding chair on sidewalks throughout the country, cheerfully dispensing tips about grammar. She recounts her adventures in a new book. And the story of the brilliant pioneer of computing language whose name lives on in a familiar term. Plus, when you get a new haircut, beware of anyone …
 
In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss “decir” and its conjugations in the present perfect and in the conditional. Before we start, I want to mention that we are offering Spanish tutoring and conversation practice services to individuals like YOU with an interest in learning Spanish. Please visit world-linguistics.com/contact and enter your name, em…
 
Loading …

Guia rápido de referências

Google login Twitter login Classic login